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Weekend Reading: Kirby, Argo, Overstreet And Palooka

Argo 2For those of us who are not already at the NYCC this weekend, here’s how the internets can keep us occupied:

Why did the Judge Dredd 3D movie flop? Here are five reasons from What Culture.

Paul O’Connor at Longbox Graveyard finds much to love about Sean Howe’s new book, Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

Scoop interviews Robert M. Overstreet, creator of the ubiquitous and essential Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide. “One of my favorite comics was Fox And The Crow. I would have Kix cereal in the morning and I would read my Fox & The Crow comics eating Kix.” I love that.

Jeff Mariotte writes about the problems of freelancing, his own writing career and a great comic strip called Cow And Boy by Mark Leiknes.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Kirby, Argo, Overstreet And Palooka


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Weekend Reading: Stephen Bissette, Jack Kirby, Stephan Pastis & Stan Lee

Posted by Tom Mason Categories: Editorials, DC Comics, Marvel Comics

Pearls Before SwineWhat ho, weekenders! And happy Canadian Thanksgiving to our hockeyless neighbors to the north!

Stephen Bissette’s Center For Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, VT has teamed up with the esteemed site Slate (via The Slate Book Review”) to launch the annual Cartoonist Studio Prize, with some real money attached for the winners. This looks like a heckuva good thing and thanks to all involved for putting it together.

Over the years, some of my favorite comics have disappeared from the newspaper as creators retired for various reasons. One of my favorites these days is Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis. Here’s Michael Cavna’s interview with him.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Stephen Bissette, Jack Kirby, Stephan Pastis & Stan Lee


Weekend Reading: Jack Kirby, Alex Toth, Harlan Ellison & Argo

Posted by Tom Mason Categories: Editorials, Movies, Marvel Comics

Argo

I am shocked - shocked, I tell you - to discover that the movie Argo (about how Jack Kirby’s designs for a screenplay based on a Roger Zelazny novel helped rescue hostages in Iran for the CIA) is playing fast and loose with history.

Michael Sporn has a long post with some nice artwork by Playboy cartoonist Rowland B. Wilson and some rare artwork by Alex Toth.

Down The Tubes interviews Paul Scoones, author of the new Doctor Who book: The Comic Strip Companion: The Unofficial and Unauthorised Guide to Doctor Who in Comics: 1964 — 1979.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Jack Kirby, Alex Toth, Harlan Ellison & Argo


Weekend Reading: Chaykin, Kubert, Harrison and Harlan

Joe KubertYou know how you can tell that Summer's over? There aren't any more big budget super-hero movies coming out. Fortunately, there's all kinds of stuff on the internets to keep us occupied.

Beau Smith writes about the late Joe Kubert.

Tom Spurgeon writes about Harry Harrison.

I would’ve watched the heck out of any Daredevil movie that was done like this trailer:

Comic Strip of the Day talks about Richard Thompson and his decision to retire from Cul de Sac because of illness.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Chaykin, Kubert, Harrison and Harlan


Weekend Reading: Batman, Doonesbury, Killraven and Kickstarter

Dark Knight RisesSo the Olympics are finally over, and that means it's time to talk about real heroes, right? Y'know, the ones in capes!

For most of us, we have the belief that Bill Finger is the true creator of everything that made Batman great. Here’s why.

Jake Hinkson looks at The Dark Knight Rises and the other two parts of Christopher Nolan’s trilogy: “Unlike the set-bound comic-gothic theatrics of Tim Burton's Batman films or the plastic sex-toy quality of Joel Schumacher's films, Batman Begins is a full on epic.”

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Batman, Doonesbury, Killraven and Kickstarter


Weekend Reading: Olympics, Dark Knight, Ellis and Watchmen

Posted by Tom Mason Categories: Editorials, Movies, DC Comics, Independent

Dark Knight RisesI know we're all very busy watching this running, jumping, swimming thing from London, but fortunately there's still time to see the gold, silver and bronze of the internets.

Warren Ellis’ tweets on the Olympics opening ceremony can’t be beat.

Award-winning novelist John Scalzi (Redshirts) blogs about his first experience at Comic Con International.

Now that Valiant’s back, you know who else is returning? A new incarnation of First Comics.

Bleeding Cool reports on a “lost” Alan Moore project seeing the light of day through Avatar.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Olympics, Dark Knight, Ellis and Watchmen


Weekend Reading: Spider-Man, Cyberforce, and Norm Breyfogle

Spider-Man MovieThis is the week where the comics industry slows down for a couple of days as everyone saves their big news for Comic Con International in San Diego. That gets going on Wednesday evening - Preview Night - and you can expect the announcements to start flying faster than anyone can cut and paste a press release, and everyone's abuzz with their favorite version of the four Spider-Man movies.

For now, though, the internets still have some things to read:

A weather-battered Beau Smith looks at Spider-Man.

Longbox Graveyard also has a look at Spider-Man, of the Steve Ditko era.

Hero Complex reports the return of Marc Silvestri’s Cyberforce, with the words “Kickstarter” and “free” as part of the launch equation.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Spider-Man, Cyberforce, and Norm Breyfogle


Weekend Reading: Frazz, Doc Savage and Spike Milligan

Posted by Tom Mason Categories: Conventions, Editorials, Reviews

FrazzTo everyone suffering through the summer heat wave, wind and electrical storms and power outages in the U.S., my heart goes out to you. If you’ve still got the internets, here are some things to help ease the pain.

Daniel Best reports on trouble at Oz Comic-Con in Australia this weekend.

With convention season in full swing, the critic Bill Sherman reviews Rob Salkowitz’ Comic-Con And The Business Of Pop Culture, an account of the 2011 Comic Con International in San Diego. “Salkowitz approaches his topic as both a business analyst and a longtime fanboy -- and he shows a commendable breadth of knowledge about both the medium and the somewhat clannish fan culture.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Frazz, Doc Savage and Spike Milligan


Weekend Reading: Avengers, Alan Moore and Don McGregor

ThanosA friend of mine has a bet that The Avengers' will gross $2 billion (with a "b") by the end of the year, so I guess we're all still talking about Earth's Mightiest Heroes.

If you’re still talking about them, Longbox Graveyard looks at Thanos and The Infinity Gauntlet.

Then LG’s honcho Paul O’Connor passes along this link with everything you need to know about Thanos.

Alan Moore, critical of movies made from his comics, is writing his own movie, which I hope someone adapts into a comic.

It’s never too late to read a story or two from Don McGregor about his father.

My pal Steven Thompson has been streamlining his collection and just recently posted a bunch of great bargains at Booksteve’s Bookstore: Kirby, Captain Marvel, Robert Crumb, Superman, Batman, Wonder Wart-Hog...you can’t go wrong!

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Avengers, Alan Moore and Don McGregor


Weekend Reading: Ray Bradbury, Alex Toth and Before Watchmen

Posted by Tom Mason Categories: Conventions, Editorials, Reviews

Fahrenheit 451The countdown to San Diego has begun. You can tell because Mark Evanier is starting to post his great stories about San Diego cons of the past.

I’ve really been enjoying his tales of the con that involve Ray Bradbury and Julie Schwartz (and MAD Magazine’s Al Feldstein). One of the things that’s being revealed is that Julie, a longtime DC Comics editor and later company ambassador, doesn’t come across as a likeable guy.

This will not come as a surprise to anyone who’s read about Evan Dorkin’s repeatedly unpleasant encounters with Schwartz.

Or to people who are familiar with Colleen Doran.

Speaking of Ray Bradbury, Frederik Pohl remembers his friend of 75 years.

Click to continue reading Weekend Reading: Ray Bradbury, Alex Toth and Before Watchmen


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